General Information
Friday 5:30pm; 8:30 pm
Saturday 5:30 pm; 8:30 pm

Subscribers must attend on day and time specified on ticket. Changes are allowed if seats are available. Holders of other tickets must wait until all appropriate tickets holders are seated.


Inclement Weather:
Number to call in case of inclement weather:
443-518-4030

Hearing Impaired:
Equipment for the hearing impaired is available in the theater.

Senior Citizens:

Columbia senior citizens may obtain transportation to theater fron a special transportation program sponsored by the Senior Advocates of the Columbia Association.
Call 410-715-3087 for information.


Lost Tickets:

If you have any questions about tickets or lost tickets, please send an email to columbiafilmsociety@gmail.com.


Past Films:

2014-2015

PRESENTED AT THE SMITH THEATER AT HCC's
HOROWITZ VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Nine Fridays/Saturdays of film for $35

Note: Friday and Saturday 5:30 pm tickets have been sold out!

Directions | Parking Info


September 19 & 20, 2014

RATING: PG

Starring Irrfan Khan, Lillete Dubey, Nimrat Kaur, Nowaz.

Middle class housewife Ila is trying to add some spice to her marriage, this time through her cooking. She desperately hopes that her new recipe will finally arouse some kind of reaction from her neglectful husband. She prepares a special lunchbox to be delivered to him at work, but, unbeknownst to her, it is mistakenly delivered to another office worker, Saajan, a lonely man on the verge of retirement. Curious about the lack of reaction from her husband, Ila puts a little note in the following day's lunchbox, in the hopes of getting to the bottom of the mystery. This begins a series of lunchbox notes between Saajan and Ila, and the mere comfort of communicating with a stranger anonymously soon evolves into an unexpected friendship. Gradually, their notes become little confessions about their loneliness, memories, regrets, fears, and even small joys. They each discover a new sense of self and find an anchor to hold on to in the big city of Mumbai that so often crushes hopes and dreams. Still strangers physically, Ila and Saajan become lost in a virtual relationship that could jeopardize both their realities. (In Hindi) (104 minutes).


October 10 & 11, 2014

Rating: Not rated

Starring Yeo Yann Yann, Chen Tianwen, Angeli Bayani, Koh Jia Ler.

Set in Singapore during the 1997 Asian financial crisis. Ilo Ilo chronicles the day-to-day drama of the Lim family - troublesome grade-schooler Jiale and his overstressed parents, Heck and Leng. Comfortably middleclass and with another baby on the way, they hire Teresa, a Filipino immigrant, as a live-in maid and nanny. An outsider in both the family and Singapore itself, Teresa initially struggles to manage Jiale's antics and find her footing in her new community. The two eventually form a unique bond, but just as Teresa becomes an unspoken part of the family, unforeseen circumstances in an uncertain economy will challenge the new normal yet again. (In Mandarin) (99 minutes).


October 24 & 25, 2014

RATING: Not rated

Starring Toni Servillo, Carlo Verdone, Sabrina Ferilli, Carlo Buccirosso, Iaia Forte, Pamela Villoresi, Galatea Ranzi.

Journalist Jep Gambardella (the dazzling Toni Servillo) has charmed and seduced his way through the lavish nightlife of Rome for decades. Since the legendary success of his one and only novel, he has been a permanent fixture in the city's literary and social circles, but when his sixty-fifth birthday coincides with a shock from the past, Jep finds himself unexpectedly taking stock of his life, turning his cutting wit on himself and his contemporaries, and looking past the extravagant nightclubs, parties, and cafés to find Rome in all its glory: a timeless landscape of absurd, exquisite beauty. “If you know Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita, you'll be unable to watch The Great Beauty without thinking about it. This gorgeous Italian movie, like La Dolce Vita, balances pungent satire and a melancholy mood in portraying the dissolute world of the upper crust in contemporary Rome.” San Francisco Examiner. The film won the 2014 Academy Award for the Best Foreign Language Film. (In Italian) (142 minutes).


November 21 & 22, 2014

RATING: PG-13

Starring Ali Mosaffa, Berenice Bejo, Elyes Aguis, Pauline Buriet, Tahar Rahim.

Following a four-year separation, Ahmad returns to Paris from Tehran, upon his estranged French wife Marie's request, in order to finalize their divorce procedure so she can marry her new boyfriend Samir. During his tense brief stay, Ahmad discovers the conflicting nature of Marie's relationship with her teenage daughter Lucie. Ahmad's efforts to improve this relationship soon unveil a secret from their past. In this film, Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi “pursues his exploration of guilt, choice and responsibility in a superbly written, directed and acted drama that commands attention every step of the way.” Village Voice (In French and Farsi) (130 minutes).


January 16 & 17, 2015

RATING: R

Starring Alex Calloway, Brie Larson, Frantz Turner, John Gallagher Jr., Kaitlyn Dever, Keith Stanfield, Kevin Hernandez, Lydia Du Veaux, Rami Malek, Stephanie Beatriz.

The best indie movies give you the feeling that their directors not only wanted but needed to make them. That's certainly true of Destin Daniel Cretton's Short Term 12, a drama of astonishing emotional purity that has the novel setting of a group foster home. It's about a crew of teenagers, deeply troubled and out of sorts, who live in drab institutional rooms and try to patch their community of fellow foster children into a makeshift family. The situation has a built-in heartbreak, but Cretton doesn't milk it. Instead, he lets each character strike a note of lived-in reality that is rarely found on screen. Short Term 12 lures you into passion and trauma: the staggeringly hopeless diary-of-a-lost-boy rap performed by Marcus (Keith Stanfield), the moodiest and most brilliant of the kids, or the journey from self-mutilation to shaky redemption undergone by Jayden (Kaitlyn Dever), who masks her innocence in attitude. The home is run by counselors who are former foster children themselves. Brie Larson, as the caring but tormented Grace (who's pregnant and doesn't know if she has the faith to have her baby), and John Gallagher Jr., as her gentle-dweeb fellow worker Mason (who fears his love can't save her), show you what emotionally naked acting is all about. Entertainment Weekly (In English) (96 minutes).


January 30 & 31, 2015

RATING: PG

Starring Waad Mohammed.

There’s a lot more going on in this first feature film from Saudi Arabia, where movie theaters are banned, than the deceptively simple story of a girl who is willing to do just about anything to buy her first bicycle. Even if that were all there was to it, though, Wadjda would still be a must-see. Wadjda is the story of a spirited 10-year-old Saudi girl discovering the severe limitations placed on women in the name of custom, Islam and family honor. With impressive agility, Wadjda finds room to maneuver between harsh realism and a more hopeful kind of storytelling. There is warmth as well as austerity in Wadjda’s world, kindness as well as cruelty, and the possibility, modestly sketched and ardently desired, of change. NY Times. This is the first feature to be directed by a woman from Saudi Arabia. Director Haifaa Al-Mansour, forbidden from mixing with the men in her crew, often directed via walkie-talkie from the back of a van. (In Arabic) (98 minutes).


February 27 & 28, 2015

RATING: Not rated

Starring Johan Liljemark, Liv LeMoyne, Mira Barkhammar, Mira Grosin.

We Are The Best! is Lukas Moodysson's adaptation of his wife Coco's graphic novel about three young misfits growing up in early '80s Stockholm. Pixieish, mohawk-sporting Klara and her best friend Bobo are 13-year-old rebels looking for a cause. Despite having no instruments-or discernible musical talent-the two put all their energy into forming an all-girl punk band, recruiting their shy, classical guitar-playing schoolmate Hedvig as the third wheel. With tender affection for his young characters and the period in which his film is set, Moodysson paints an ebullient and sharply observant portrait of DIY [do it yourself] spirit and growing up different. In reviewing this film, The Guardian reviewer asked, “When was the last time you left a cinema wanting to hug everyone involved in the film you just watched? Plenty of movies amuse and entertain, many more give us an insight into an unfamiliar world. But very few generate the swell of audience goodwill that has followed Swedish director Lukas Moodysson’s exuberant portrait of 1980s teen rebellion.” (In Swedish) (102 minutes).


April 17 & 18, 2015

RATING: PG-13

Starring Barbara Gordon, Campbell Scott, Geneviève Bujold, George R. Robertson, James Cromwell, Jonathan Potts, Julie Stewart, Rick Roberts, Ronan Rees, Zachary Bennett.

Based on true events and laced with wry humor, Still Mine tells the heartfelt tale of Craig Morrison (James Cromwell), who comes up against the system when he sets out to build a more suitable house for his ailing wife Irene (Geneviève Bujold). Although Morrison uses the same methods his father, an accomplished shipbuilder, taught him, times have changed. He quickly gets blindsided by local building codes and bureaucratic officials. As Irene becomes increasingly ill - and amidst a series of stop-work orders - Craig races to finish the house. Hauled into court and facing jail, Craig takes a final stance against all odds in a truly inspirational story. Still Mine won the Audience Award as the most popular film at the 2013 Rehoboth Film Festival. (In English) (102 minutes).


May 22 & 23, 2015

RATING: Not rated

This film explores the last quarter century of the great if eccentric British painter J.M.W. Turner (1775-1851). Profoundly affected by the death of his father, loved by a housekeeper he takes for granted and occasionally exploits sexually, he forms a close relationship with a seaside landlady with whom he eventually lives incognito in Chelsea, where he dies. Throughout this film, he travels, paints, stays with the country aristocracy, visits brothels, is a popular if anarchic member of the Royal Academy of Arts, has himself strapped to the mast of a ship so that he can paint a snowstorm, and is both celebrated and reviled by the public and by royalty. Peter Bradshaw of the Guardian says: “What a glorious film this is, richly and immediately enjoyable, hitting its satisfying stride straight away. It's funny and visually immaculate; it combines domestic intimacy with an epic sweep and has a lyrical, mysterious quality that perfumes every scene, whether tragic or comic.” (In English ) (149 minutes).